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CRANK ZAPPA

AMIGO & AMIGO

Globally we dump more than 8 million tonnes of plastic into the ocean each year. Plastic bags are particularly harmful as they are often mistaken for jellyfish by marine creatures such as turtles who then ingest them, leading to starvation and death. Each year, over 100,000 marine animals die from plastic entanglement. Inspired to address this issue, Amigo & Amigo collaborated with Plasticwise to create this interactive artwork.

Crank Zappa the Jellyfish, is an interactive sculpture created from plastic waste. Lights animate and respond to touch sensors at the end of the tentacles. The sculpture is also accompanied by music and voice acting to bring the character of Crank Zappa to life, while educating the public on plastic waste.

Crank Zappa is completely constructed from single use plastic items including 1000 plastic bags, straws, 800 plastic bottles that were salvaged from Scotts Creek and 1200 meters of recycled twine that was weaved together by 40 volunteers. As visitors gather under Crank, he electrifies and animates in response to human touch.

ABOUT THE ARTISTS

Amigo & Amigo is an interactive lighting and design studio that explores the combination of light and sculpture in public and commercial spaces. The studio works with electrical engineers to customise lighting elements that adapt to their experimental forms. More recently Amigo & Amigo have begun incorporating kinetic movement into their installations, further experimenting with light and movement, and how this can ignite the imagination.

Their projects are predominantly large scale. They are playful in nature and are designed to transform environments into memorable experiences, encouraging audiences to interact.

Amigo & Amigo’s installation work has been featured at Sydney’s Vivid Light Festival for the last three consecutive years. Their Vivid 2015 installation, Affinity, was commissioned by Destination NSW and featured outside Sydney’s Museum of Contemporary Art. Their Vivid 2012 installation, Ray, was surveyed by IBM as the most popular sculpture at Vivid Sydney.